Artists

POBA artists are a creative lot, with talents that run the full gamut of artistic expression. Most are not well known to the general public, while a few are quite famous in a specific region, art form or field but otherwise did not receive broader recognition. Though quite varied, POBA portfolios display art works and collections  and tell the stories of artists that equally deserve to be seen, known and appreciated.

Directory of Artists:

A. E. Backus

Albert Ernest "Beanie" Backus (1906–1990) was a true character, a man whose art and life were American originals. Famous for his vivid Florida landscapes capturing a fast-vanishing Florida wild lands in pre-WW2 Florida, he was equally famous for his generosity, his eccentricity, his teaching skill and his prodigious and diverse artistic output, spanning nearly 70 years. Backus would come to be seen as the seminal Florida landscape painter, and others who followed emulated him.

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Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson

Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson (1940-2015) was born and lived in Columbus, Ohio. With a style that defies customary artistic categories by blending the folk traditions she learned as a child from her parents and from the formal training she received in art school, Aminah created elegant pen and ink drawings, layered cloth paintings, bold woodcuts, embellished sculptures, music boxes, RagGonNons (complex, mixed media works) and woodcut, lithographed and one-of-a-kind handmade books.

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Anabel Holland

Anabel Schreiber Holland (1923-2011) studied art at the Corcoran School in Washington, DC, and the Art Institute of Chicago. Drawing and painting came naturally to her. Her work was ebullient, and inventive, transformed by her fragile health and complex family life.

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Andrew Gold

Andrew Gold (1951-2011) possessed prodigious talent, found rarely in each generation: a passionate singer, a astute songwriter, a creative producer, and a virtuoso on multiple musical instruments. He was also skilled with drawing and fashioned many works on paper, including self-portraits, studies, cartoons, illustrated commentaries, and more. On POBA, we see some of his never-released demos and recordings as well as original works on paper.

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Badfinger / Pete Ham and Tom Evans

Badfinger - Pete Ham (1947-1975) & Tom Evans (1947-1983). The classic rock band, Badfinger, was both exceptionally talented and star-crossed. Its chief songwriters and performers, Pete Ham and Tom Evans, were also artists in other genres besides music. Here for the first time, never-heard demos are tied to Ham’s and Evans’ private drawings to reveal the depth of their artistry.

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Barbara Shilo

Barbara Shilo (1923-2015) drew evocative paintings using real and symbolic subject matter to express her concerns for social justice. She is best known for her exhibit, Silent Voices Speak, a vivid depiction of Jewish life leading up to and during the Holocaust.

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Ben-Zion

Ben-Zion (1897-1987) devoted his life to beauty in all its manifestations: from the visual, to the literary, to the musical. He threaded nature, still life, the human figure, the Hebrew Bible, and the Jewish people into his work. A founding member of “The Ten,” he remained independent in his views and his art throughout his very active, long life.

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Blake Van Hoof Packard

Blake Van Hoof Packard (1994-2010) lived a short 16 years, yet his paintings reveal both a vision and a talent that are simply “cosmic.” As a turn-of-the-21st century artist, Blake got the Packard family gene for line, color and form, but had an entirely different object of fascination than any of his predecessors.

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Bob Guccione

In both his public and in his private life, Bob Guccione (1930-2010) found his essential passion and lifelong artistic expression in painting, drawing and photography. His remarkable artistic talent and vision has oddly been obscured by fame and controversy, rather than illuminated by them. Here, we have an opportunity to experience what Guccione saw and created by his own hand: the rich colors, soft lines, and deep feeling he captures in his paintings of everyday scenes of life.

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Carol Kessler

Carol Kessler (1916-2004) was an artist and designer in San Jose, CA for over 60 years. Adventurous in life and on the canvas, Carol created drawn works in oil, acrylic, pastel, watercolor, collages, graphic arts, fiber arts, wearable arts and became especially proficient in the demanding work of serigraphy (silk screening). She also was a pioneer in culinary arts, viewing this an art form on its own. Her work in fiber arts remains groundbreaking to this day.

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Carol C. Carlisle

Carol C. Carlisle (1924-2011) epitomized the artistry of the editor during her nearly 35-year career as Managing Editor of Popular Photography magazine, where she was celebrated for her keen eye and unswerving sense of perfection. During her career, she preserved more than 1,200 about-to-be-destroyed photos, largely by then “unknowns,” but which history shows are photographic treasures that she saved from oblivion.

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Charles Furr

Charles Key Furr (1928-2014) was born in Amarillo, TX. He lived, studied, taught and painted in Mexico, Europe and the Southwest U. S. for over 60 years. He studied fine arts and anthropology in Texas, Colorado, New York, Boston, Italy and Mexico D.F and teaching in New Mexico, and Colorado. Charles exhibited work in PA, NM, TX, CO, Italy, and Mexico.

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Clark Tippet

Clark Tippet (1955-1992) was one of the most acclaimed dancers and most promising choreographers of ballet in modern American dance. As Principal Dancer for the American Ballet Theatre (1976-1990), he danced in and with some of the greatest talents of his day including Baryshnikov, Tharp, and Parsons, and created numerous works for ABT and other dance companies.

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Daniel Mincer

Daniel Mincer (1953-1981) grew up immersed in both the music and visual arts of the 1960s-1970s. He was an active and engaged young artist who worked fluently in several media including oil, pastel, batik and charcoal/pencil. His subjects were derived from daily life, including still compositions, photographs, self-portraits and nudes. His works reveal a compelling mix of visual clarity, technical proficiency and strong emotional content.

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David Shainberg

David Shainberg (1932-1993) used abstract expressionism with total release to render the intensity of his creative process poignantly evident in his paintings, where he created landscapes and illusions of figures with a striking sense of energy and mood.

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David Prifti

David Prifti (1961-2011) lived his life with passion, relentless energy and an unfaltering appetite for art and learning. A dedicated father, husband and an inspirational teacher, he was famous for saying “Do something for your art every day!” As these works show, he relished and captured personal connection. Prifti created two distinct bodies of work, Photographic Assemblages and Tintypes, which show us his mastery of the wet plate collodion method of the 1850s.

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Doris Chase

Doris Totten Chase (1923-2008) was a bi-coastal artist - engaged in and well recognized in New York City for her groundbreaking video and film projects, and equally regarded in Seattle for her paintings, woodworks, and sculptures, large and small. Her life was memorable, her work was groundbreaking, and her public art is enduring. ArtsWA, the Washington State Arts Council, has recognized Doris Chase as one of its most pre-eminent artists.

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Eli Waldron

Eli Waldron (1916-1980) was a remarkably talented literary and visual artist, whose articles, short stories, poems and drawings reveal penetrating wit, wry humor, uncanny imagination, and an enduring artistic and social sensibility. Part of a literary circle that included Richard Gehman, Hollis Alpert, Josephine Herbst, S. J. Perleman, and J. D. Salinger, Waldron was published both during his lifetime and posthumously.

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Elijah Pierce

Renowned folk artist and wood carver, Elijah Pierce (1892- 1984), the youngest son of a former slave, was born on a cotton farm in Baldwyn, Mississippi. Under the instruction of his uncle, Elijah learned to carve wood at age 7 using a pocketknife that his father gave him. A devoted husband, preacher, and barber, his life-long talents as a woodcarver were only discovered publicly during the last decade of his life. Among many honors, Elijah Pierce received the Ohio Governor's Heritage Award.

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Friedolin Kessler

Friedolin Kessler (1913-1995) was a resident camp artist of the Missouri (and later) San Jose, CA CCC where he remained a prolific artist and teacher. Friedolin was accomplished in oil painting, watercolor, charcoal, linoleum cuts, photography, and wood mosaics. His entire life was about art.

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Gene Spatz

Eugene “Gene” Spatz (1943-2003) was a pioneer of the paparazzi movement in America. A keen observer from a very young age, he wielded his camera to give the public captivating insight into the fabulous lives of New York, Hollywood and other celebrities during the 1970s and 80s. The range of personalities and styles in his photos is vast, including the likes of Andy Warhol, Robert DeNiro, Muhammad Ali, John Lennon, Mary Tyler Moore, members of the Kennedy family, and many more.

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George Tate

George Tate (1920-1992) captured the giddiness and hope of a place and time with mesmerizing depictions of mid-century Southern California and Las Vegas. From the 1950s on, his photos show both the ordinary features and extraordinary vibrancy of the southwest, including Vegas and southern California, with its hustle and bustle, Hollywood hopefuls, beach life, and the swooping car life that presaged California’s new suburbs.

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George Tooker

George Tooker (1920-2011) was a man and artist of great contrast and talent. While energetically engaged in dramatic, real world social causes such as the Civil Rights Movement, his artistic works stress form over emotion to serve as a political and social statement about the anonymity, social alienation, mass production and bleakness of modern public life. His main themes - love, death, sex, grief, aging, alienation, and religious faith - portray universal human experiences with spare beauty

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Helen Corning

Helen Corning (1921-2011) painted exquisite abstractions - large canvases revealing a spare palate of earth tones and a layered simplicity honed over 60 years of painting. Her life and her life’s work were proudly described by her lapel pin: ART SAVES LIVES.

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Helen Farr Sloan

Helen Farr Sloan (1911–2005) represents a unique artist on POBA, for she was not only a talented artist and print maker in her own right, but also a patron of the arts, educator, and the main proponent of her husband’s artistic legacy, the American master, John Sloan. From age 16 and through her twenties, she produced a canon of ambitious prints and paintings focusing on NYC cafes and street life, New Mexico scenes and people, and figure studies.

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Jamie Bernard

Jamie Bernard (1987-2010) was a prodigious young writer and artist who filtered contemporary culture through a prism of youth and alienation, supported by keen observation and a consuming passion for literature, history, and international affairs.

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Jim Terrell

Jim Terrell (1944-1989) was an architect's architect, transforming the look and flow of major department stores in the 1970s and 80s, including Macy's, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdale's, and Marshall Field, among others. He notably also designed "in-store" boutiques tying retail store design to some of the leading fashion trends of his time. His award-winning designs also led to stunning corporate architecture as well.

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Josh Holland

Josh Holland (1921-2011) studied at the Art Institute in Chicago and kept sketchbooks for 75 years. Following a seminal 33-year career in meteorology, he returned to art as a primary focus in 1981. A realist, he painted beauty he saw in people and places, visibly exploring relationships in space.

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Ken Kendrick

Ken Kendrick (1949-1992) was an acclaimed graphic designer and a former art director of The New York Times Magazine. Born in Hemingway, S.C., Ken spent much of his youth in Georgia. In 1971, he graduated from the Atlanta College of Art. Little did he or we know that he would become one of the most influential and distinctive graphic designers of his generation, notwithstanding his short life of just 43 years.

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LaForce Bailey

Scenes of everyday life—the wharves, working folk, fishing vessels, the Spit & Chatter Club—these are the subjects that intrigued LaForce Bailey (1893-1962)and are the subjects of his paintings. His complex compositions combine bold strokes, broad washes of color, and details that capture the times in which they were painted.

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Leopold Allen

Leopold Allen (1945-1989) was an artist for the American Ballet Theatre whose artistry was to "make up" ABT’s dancers to embody and project the roles they were performing. From the evil fairy, Carabosse, to the luminous Sleeping Beauty, and hundreds of characters in between, Leopold designed and applied the makeup, wigs (and often the shoes) of ABT’s dancers.

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Leslie Gillette Jackson

Leslie Gillette Jackson (1921- 2013) was a painter and poet, expressing masterful words and works with uncommon elegance, intelligence and perceptiveness. Distinguished by their unique use of form, texture, shape, color, and words, and by the profound thinking behind her words and works, her works include acrylic and watercolor, ink, pencil, crayon and collage, “icons” and triptychs – vibrant works on wood that combine these elements - and collections of poetry and drawings.

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Lilian Tyrrell

Lilian Tyrrell (1944 – 2007) witnessed a fire that changed her life, leading her to become a fiber artist who created some 70 tapestries in her breathtaking career. Intricate and arresting, beautiful but bleak, her work explored ongoing tragedies such as political greed, religious intolerance, racism, terrorism, and more. Her colors and fabric may be rich, but her imagery is a plainspoken, bare-knuckled critique of our collective conscience, shining with both the warmth and ferocity of fire.

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Lillian Orlowsky

By skill and temperament, Lillian Orlowsky (1917-2007) was perfectly suited to become the artistic revolutionary her life’s work would reveal. She, along with her husband and fellow artist, William Freed, were in the vanguard of the cultural transformation in American art in the 1930s to 1950s, one of the greatest periods of American social upheaval as well.

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Louis Nardo

Louis Nardo (1946-2009) possessed an artist’s soul, a painter’s vision and a craftsman’s hands. He was exceptionally skilled at painting, woodworking, ceramics, graphics and 3D animation, and most powerfully in his photography. Nardo’s images show reverence for the thing itself (“eo ipso”) - the simple day-to-day objects that through his camera’s eye are captured with astonishing brilliance, relief, and vividness.

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Mark Tobey

Mark Tobey (1890-1976) was first and foremost an exceptional painter, though he also created works in stone and in music as well. Within his artwork, he was also remarkably innovative. He will forever be known for two major artistic accomplishments: co-founding the Northwest School of Art and creation of the painting technique called “white writing.” He has been credited with changing the course of modern art in the Pacific Northwest. Tobey’s works are brought to us in collaboration with POBA

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Martin Wong

Martin Wong (1946-1999) was a painter whose visionary realism is among the lasting legacies of New York's East Village art scene of the 1980s. His meticulously executed works were also a precursor of the identity-driven art scene of the 90s. His complex works weave traditional Chinese styles, urban art and graffito, and homoerotic imagery to form complex and unique works. Martin painted until the last day of his life, passing from complications related to AIDS.

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Mel Cheren

Mel Cheren (1933-2007) was an innovative record executive who helped start the Paradise Garage, a focal point of the downtown Manhattan gay disco scene in the 1970s and ’80s, and who ran the very successful West End music label through the 90s. But Cheren also had a creative life outside of music, and was an exceptional painter. The works displayed on POBA remain on display at Colonial House Inn, a gay-friendly B&B in NYC, which he founded in the mid 80s and operated until his death.

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Michael Malpass

Michael Malpass (1946-1991) was a gentle giant, a man possessed of both great presence and immense strength who wielded these powers in the pursuit of beauty. His body of work was eclectic, but he was best known for his sculpture, especially the spheres he forged from found industrial objects. His career saw him continually broaden the scope of his creative efforts – at the time of his untimely death he had created 300 sculptures, as well as extensive artworks in other mediums.

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Nancy Whorf

Nancy Whorf (1930-2009) was an inventive painter, best known for her vibrant, varied scenes of the fishing village where she lived all her life on Cape Cod. She painted the town and its memorable characters as a visual memoirist – rather than in any effort to recreate it accurately.

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Nancy Webb

Nancy Webb (1926-2012) was an artistic powerhouse. She began her art career as a painter and print maker in the 1940s, creating book jacket covers for works including Isaac Bashevis Singer and some of her own books for children. By the late 1960s, Webb was also a sculptor, creating large modernist works as well as smaller, more sensual and ephemeral works of the natural world, brimming with symbolic and earthy meanings. Her works are in many collections, including POBA’s partner, PAAM.

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Nicholas A. Moufarrege

Nicholas A. Moufarrege (1947-1985) was a critic, a curator and artist. During his lifetime, he was better known for his roles as critic and curator. In a very short art career, he created wry, fun, dead-pan serious, and perceptive works through subjects that he portrayed in embroidered images on needlepoint canvas using unusually rich colors and textures. Posthumously, his canon confirms that he deserves to be remembered more for his art than for his art criticism.

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Norma Holt

Norma Holt (1918-2013) was a prolific photographer whose focus on children, women and the working poor in New York, the larger U.S., and internationally, revealed the everyday faces of humanity during tumultuous, often pivotal moments in history. From the streets of New York to the Israeli-Arab conflict and a fishing community in Cape Cod, Holt captured real people in simple, powerful images.

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Norman Mailer

Norman Mailer (1923-2007) lived a life larger than the literary characters he created and for which he became [in]famous. A man of wide ranging and provocative inclinations in his literary, political and personal life, he was largely unknown as an artist even though he was personally quite proud of his drawings. Here they are widely displayed for the first time at POBA.

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Pamela Roberts

Pamela Roberts (1953-1998) was a largely self-taught artist in L.A., whose interests spanned punk music, tattoo art, and finally, her own unforgettable paintings. At the time of her death, she was gaining well-deserved recognition as an “urban outsider.” Her work is characterized by a unique combination of beauty, warmth, sweetness, and wit.

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Patrick Kelly

Love was the center of Patrick Kelly’s world. The designer opened each of his runway shows by spray-painting a heart on the back wall of the stage in the spirit of urban street art. Kelly’s warmth, generosity, and loving spirit were legendary. Wherever he went he brought people together—his studios, showrooms, and home were a welcoming place of acceptance for friends both old and new.

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Phyllis Sklar

Phyllis Sklar (1924-2010) was an artist of many expressions; best known for her primitive paintings of contemporary themes and landscapes and for her imaginatively rendered hand-wrought jewelry.

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Raphael Boguslav

Raphael Boguslav (1929-2010) devoted his life to the arts as his passion, career and hobby. His calligraphic work includes some of the most extraodinary images and projects in recent times, while his logo design work created some of the most enduring "trademark" brands known.

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Richard C. Elliott

Richard C. Elliott (1945-2008) was a lifelong explorer of color and pattern in his quest to express the primal sources of art and the play of light in form. Initially, drawing was his main medium, but he eventually chose a decidedly utilitarian medium: safety reflectors. This “reflector art” broke the bounds between conventional and innovative art and brought him eventually full circle to drawn works on the computer through richly colored, geometric graphics of virtually infinite variety.

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Roger Anderson

Roger Anderson (1916-2005) lived an artful and art-filled life. In Distant Thunder is found a narrative of our country; the heroes and villains who created it, and the major milestones, battles and scars proudly carried within its history. Included in his collections are Anderson’s personally recorded neverbefore- heard audio interviews of original Arizona pioneer women. These recordings are of great historical significance.

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Salli LoveLarkin

Salli LoveLarkin (1937- 1999), was an artist, major arts advocate and innovator in the arts, particularly for her beloved hometown, Cincinnati OH. Tapping into various media for expression, she was a visual artist, performer, costume designer, and theater director, in addition to holding three key positions of leadership as a well-respected arts administrator. Among many accomplishments, Salli LoveLarkin recieved the prestigious Ohio Governor’s Award for the Arts.

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Schulman Collection

As part of a project of the Art of Letter Writing, POBA became engaged in cataloging and archiving a collection of 1100 letters wartime letters - the Schulman Collection - that reveal a remarkable personal romance and an exceptional - but unexpected - window on history that stretches across the US to the Buchenwald camp, other parts of Europe and back. Here, excerpts from the Schulman Collection are available for viewing for the first time.

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Sylvester

Sylvester (1947–1988) was an unabashedly flamboyant, cross-dressing, and cross-genre recording artist who took the 70s by storm in disco, then moved back to his roots in gospel and soul in the 1980s. In the last 10 years of his life, Sylvester broke many records in music and barriers in life, leaving a remarkable vocal legacy and groundbreaking path of personal courage, kindness and dignity behind.

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Toni Schiff

Toni Fields Schiff (1931-2013) became a painter late in life, and most notably, after she became blind in her 50s and developed Parkinson’s disease in her 60s. Undaunted, Toni created strong, colorful, and detailed works that range from the delicious to the mysterious. Her paintings are a pleasure to view both from the outside and through a canvas window into the artist’s mind.

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William Freed

William Freed was a pivotal artist at the turning point of American art in the 20th Century. From the 1930s to the 1950s and beyond, Freed was a central figure in the abstract expressionist movement led by Hans Hoffman which would lead generations of artists to break the grip of traditional representational art, Impressionism, and “realism” that had prevailed until then.

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William J. Higginson

William J. Higginson (1938-2008), was a American master of a Japanese art form - the haiku. Born in New York City, in Bergenfield, NJ later returning to Paterson NJ for native son, William Carlos Williams. He attended MIT, joined the US Air Force, which sent him to Yale to learn Japanese, then posted him for two years to Misawa Air Base, where he mastered Japanese through the study of verse. This would change the course of his personal and creative life.

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